Where’s my stimulus check? Here’s when your payment should arrive

Where’s my stimulus check? Here’s when your payment should arrive

  • As of June 5, about 159 million stimulus payments had arrived in Americans’ bank accounts and mailboxes.
  • Most of the payments were delivered by direct deposit, in addition to paper checks, Direct Express card deposits for federal benefits recipients, and nearly 4 million prepaid debit cards.
  • A House Ways and Means Committee report estimates that some 30 to 35 million payments still have not been delivered. 
  • The schedule is subject to change. This post will be updated to reflect the latest information.
  • Read more personal finance coverage.

About 159 million coronavirus stimulus payments had been issued by June 5, according to the Treasury Department.

Most people were paid by direct deposit, while others who didn’t have bank information on file with the IRS were mailed a paper check or a prepaid debit card. Some Americans who receive federal benefits, such as Social Security, were paid via Direct Express card.

Why haven’t I gotten a stimulus check?

According to a June 5 report from the House Committee on Ways and Means, up to 35 million stimulus payments still need to be delivered.

According to the committee’s analysis, those waiting on payments include up to 18 million taxpayers who filed returns with income below the CARES Act thresholds; about 7.5 million Social Security and Railroad Retirement Board recipients who do not file tax returns; and 10.7 million nonfilers and who do not receive federal benefits.

If you don’t receive federal benefits or file a tax return because your income is too low, you can register for a stimulus payment on the IRS website by October 15.

Here are other reasons your check could be delayed.

Where is my stimulus check being sent?

If you filed 2018 or 2019 tax return and got a tax refund, the money is being sent to the same account where you received your refund.

If the bank account has been closed the payment will bounce back to the IRS and they’ll send a paper check to the address listed on your latest tax return or change-of-address filed with the US Postal Service. If you didn’t get a tax refund in the last two years, the IRS asks that you enter your bank information in an online tool or wait for a paper check.

If you receive Social Security retirement or disability benefits, Railroad Retirement benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), or Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits, you’ll get your stimulus payment the exact same way you normally get paid, whether by direct deposit, Direct Express, or mail.

If you receive a call, email, Facebook message, or other communication about your stimulus check, it’s probably a scam. The government will never ask you to verify personal information over the phone and certainly will not ask for money.

If you have filed a tax return and don’t receive federal benefits, you can track your stimulus payment on the IRS website, which is updated once a day.

Here’s when you can expect your stimulus payment to arrive, based on all the information we have so far.

The schedule is subject to change. This post will be updated to reflect the latest information.

Nearly 159 million payments were issued as of June 5

By June 5, about 159 million stimulus payments were sent to Americans. 

Most people on Social Security retirement and disability benefits, Railroad Retirement benefits, SSI, and VA benefits, were paid automatically, even if they haven’t filed a recent tax return.

The payments were for the maximum amount — $1,200 — and sent by deposit or mailing information where they normally receive their benefits.

Dependents older than 16, people without a Social Security number, and those with incomes above $99,000 (or $136,500 if you file as a head of household) did not qualify for stimulus check.

Around 4 million prepaid debit cards were sent beginning the week of May 18

As of June 5, nearly 4 million prepaid Visa debit cards loaded with stimulus payments had been mailed to qualifying Americans, according to a House Ways and Means Committee report.

The debit cards — formally called an EIP Card — are issued by MetaBank and were mailed to the recipient’s last known address on file with the IRS or US Postal Service. Only one card is provided per family. The cards can be used to withdraw cash from an ATM, transfer funds to a bank account, order checks, or make purchases wherever Visa is accepted.

Paper checks started going out in April

The IRS was slated to begin issuing checks on April 24 to people who didn’t provide direct deposit, according to an internal memo reviewed by The Washington Post

As of June 5, about 35 million paper checks were delivered.

It’s unclear whether the IRS will continue to send out paper checks now that it is delivering some payments by prepaid debit card. 

Up to 35 million payments haven’t reached Americans yet

According to the House Ways and Means Committee analysis, between 30 and 35 million stimulus payments have yet to be delivered. 

The people waiting on these payments include up to 18 million taxpayers who filed returns with income below the CARES Act thresholds; about 7.5 million Social Security and Railroad Retirement Board recipients who do not file tax returns; and 10.7 million nonfilers and who do not receive federal benefits.

The committee’s report notes that the IRS has over 4 million tax returns to open and process now that the agency is back in the office. That backlog could include first-time filers who qualify for a stimulus payment as well.

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